Don’t Eat Grapefruit While on These Medications

by Chris Curley on November 29, 2012

Grapefruit lovers, watch your medications: the number of drugs that react poorly to the breakfast fruit has been expanded from 17 to 43, according to a new Canadian study.

Compounds in grapefruit called furanocoumarins make some drugs less effective by interfering with how your body breaks them down, and in some cases can cause severe side-effects including kidney failure, blood clots, and breathing problems, ABC News reported Nov. 26.

“The frequency of these reactions may be small, but the risks are not worth it, especially for drugs which could cause sudden death,” says lead study author David Bailey, Ph.D., of the University of Western Ontario.

The list of drugs that interact with grapefruit follows:

  • Alfentanil (oral)
  • Amiodarone
  • Apixaban
  • Atorvastatin
  • Buspirone
  • Clopidogrel
  • Crizotinib
  • Cyclosporine
  • Darifenacin
  • Dasatinib
  • Dextromethorphan
  • Domperidone
  • Dronedarone
  • Eplerenone
  • Erlotinib
  • Erythromycin
  • Everolimus
  • Felodipine
  • Fentanyl (oral)
  • Fesoterodine
  • Halofantrine
  • Ketamine (oral)
  • Latatinib
  • Lovastatin
  • Lurasidone
  • Maraviroc
  • Nifedipine
  • Nilotinib
  • Oxycodone
  • Pazopanib
  • Pimozide
  • Primaquine
  • Quinine
  • Quetiapine
  • Quinidine
  • Rilpivirine
  • Rivaroxaban
  • Silodosin
  • Simvastatin
  • Sirolimus
  • Solifenacin
  • Sunitinib
  • Tacrolimus
  • Tamsulosin
  • Ticagrelor
  • Triazolam
  • Vandetanib
  • Venurafenib
  • Verapamil
  • Ziprasidone

The study appears online in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

(Photo © dullhunk via Flickr)