Physical Health

Even Decaf Coffee Has Liver Benefits

Research shows that any coffee — regular or decaf — can protect against abnormal liver enzyme levels, suggesting that it is something other than caffeine that’s beneficial. The New York Times reported Oct. 20 that researchers led by Qian Xiao of┬áthe National Cancer Institute found that people who drink cups of coffee daily enjoy a […]

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Music Can Make Your Intense Workout Seem Easier

You can ease the pain of a strenuous workout by loading up your iPod with some favorite tunes, the New York Times reported Oct. 22. High-intensity interval training lasting 15 or 20 minutes can be highly beneficial to your health, but taxing enough that many people try to avoid it. Music, however, can make such […]

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No Link Found Between Vaccines and MS

Vaccines for hepatitis B and human pappiloma virus (HPV) are not associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis, according to researchers at Kaiser Permanente Southern California. LiveScience reported Oct. 21 that the study was conducted in response to concerns raised by some anti-vaccination groups, which claimed that the Hep B and HPV vaccines contain ingredients […]

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Gender Differences in Fat Storage Offer Clues About Chronic Illness

A recent animal study suggests that males and females process and store fat differently, offering clues to the links among a high-fat diet, obesity, and conditions like diabetes and heart disease. Fox News reported Oct. 16 that male rats fed a diet mirroring the fat, sugar, and carbohydrate consumption of the average American developed type […]

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Swimming is Safe and Effective Exercise for Older Adults

The best type of exercise for older adults may be swimming — the one type of activity that lowers the risk of falls among the elderly. LiveScience reported Oct. 20 that Australian researchers who studied active men ages 70 and older found that those who swam were 33 percent less likely to suffer a fall […]

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Double Dosing Sick Kids a Common Mistake

Got a sick kid? Double-check the dosage before treating them with medication. Fox News reported Oct. 20 that it’s fairly common for parents and other caregivers to administer the wrong dose of medicine to children under age 6 — and especially those under age one. Double-dosing is among the mistakes made most: typically, one parent […]

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Control Sugar to Cut Tooth Decay

Risk of developing calories increases dramatically as sugar consumption grows from one to 10 percent of total daily calories, British researchers report. Based on the findings, a new study recommends that adults cut their sugar intake to no more than 5 percent of daily calories, Men’s Health reported Oct. 19. The Institute of Medicine’s recommendation […]

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Sugary Sodas May Affect Longevity

A soda a day could cut years off your life, the Washington Post reported Oct. 20. Researchers from the University of California at San Francisco found that people who consume the most sugary drinks tend to have shorter telomeres — caps on the ends of chromosomes. Shorter telomeres are a sign of cellular aging. From […]

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Some People May Be More Sensitive to Fructose

The rise in obesity rates in the U.S. coincides with more widespread use of high-fructose corn syrup, and a new study suggests that some people may be more likely to store fructose as fat, the New York Times reported Oct. 13. Harvard Medical School researchers found a specific hormone (called FGF21) that rises in response […]

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What’s Your Fitness Age?

Measuring the health of your cardiovascular system is a better way to gauge your longevity than simply looking at your chronological age, the New York Times reported Oct. 15. Cardiovascular endurance is the measure used to define your “fitness age,” which in turn can help predict how long you will live. Endurance is calculated by […]

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